ridicule

ridicule vb Ridicule, deride, mock, taunt, twit, rally are comparable when they mean to make a person or thing the object of laughter.
Ridicule implies deliberate and often malicious belittling of the person or thing ridiculed
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the old State religion which Augustine attacks, ridiculing the innumerable Roman godlings whose names he perhaps found in Varro— Inge

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the man who wants to preserve his personal identity is ridiculed as an eccentric— Harris

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Deride implies a bitter or contemptuous spirit
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he took his revenge on the fate that had made him sad by fiercely deriding everything— Huxley

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sardonic wisecracks in which supposedly lofty ideals are mercilessly derided— Times Lit. Sup.

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Mock stresses scornful derision and usually implies words or gestures or sometimes acts expressive of one's defiance or contempt
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nowhere can men be entirely happy while human nature is still being mocked and tortured on other parts of the globe— Kennan

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When used in reference to things, mock often implies a setting at naught that suggests scorn or derision
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a perishing that mocks the gladness of the spring!— Wordsworth

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a joke was a good way to mock reality, to dodge an issue, to escape involvement— Maclnnes

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Taunt implies both mockery and reproach; it often connotes jeering insults
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taunted in fun or in earnest with the foibles and shortcomings of their fathers— de Lag una

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he . . . took no part in the revivals and usually teased and taunted those who did— J. M. Hunt

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Twit may come close to taunt and imply a mocking or cruel casting something up to someone
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the absence of ideas with which Matthew Arnold twits them— Inge

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a British author snooting American food is like the blind twitting the one-eyed— Liebling

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but twit, like rally, may imply no more than good-natured raillery or friendly ridicule
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the paper delights in twitting new laws— Newsweek

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a useful place for getting away from the cheery rallying of . . . the English governess— Nancy Hale

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Analogous words: *scoff, flout, jeer, gibe: caricature, burlesque, travesty (see under CARICATURE n)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • ridicule — [ ridikyl ] adj. et n. m. • 1500; lat. ridiculus, de ridere « rire » I ♦ Adj. 1 ♦ De nature à provoquer le rire, à exciter la moquerie, la dérision. ⇒ risible; dérisoire. Par ext. (l idée de rire disparaissant) Très mauvais, d une insignifiance… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • ridicule — 1. (ri di ku l ) adj. 1°   Digne de risée, en parlant des personnes et des choses. •   Je ne m étonne pas que vous ayez ri tout votre soûl, en m écrivant l étrange bruit qui court de moi, que je n ai ni bonté ni amitié ; car, sans mentir, il ne s …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • ridicule — Ridicule. adj. de t. g. Digne de risée, de mocquerie. Que cela est ridicule! il nous dit des choses si ridicules. cet homme là s est rendu ridicule. on l a tourné en ridicule. Il est quelquefois subst. ainsi on dit, C est un ridicule, pour dire,… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Ridicule — Rid i*cule, n. [F. ridicule, L. ridiculum a jest, fr. ridiculus. See {Ridiculous}.] 1. An object of sport or laughter; a laughingstock; a laughing matter. [1913 Webster] [Marlborough] was so miserably ignorant, that his deficiencies made him the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ridicule — [rid′i kyo͞ol΄] n. [Fr < L ridiculum, a jest, laughable (thing), neut. of ridiculus, laughable, comical < ridere, to laugh < IE * wrizd , to avert the face (> Sans vrīda, embarrassment) < base * wer , to turn] 1. a) the act of… …   English World dictionary

  • Ridicule — Rid i*cule, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Ridiculed};p. pr. & vb. n. {Ridiculing}.] To laugh at mockingly or disparagingly; to awaken ridicule toward or respecting. [1913 Webster] I ve known the young, who ridiculed his rage. Goldsmith. [1913 Webster] Syn …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Ridicule — Rid i*cule, a. [F.] Ridiculous. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] This action . . . became so ridicule. Aubrey. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ridicule — [n] contemptuous laughter at someone or something badinage, banter, buffoonery, burlesque, caricature, chaff, comeback, contempt, derision, dig*, disdain, disparagement, farce, foolery, gibe, irony, jab*, jeer, laughter, leer, mockery, mordancy,… …   New thesaurus

  • Ridicule — (fr., spr. Ridikühl), 1) lächerlich; 2) lächerliche Seite; daher sich ein R. geben, sich lächerlich machen …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • ridicule — I noun buffoonery, burlesque, caricature, chaff, contempt, derision, derisiveness, disdain, disparagement, disrespect, game, gibe, jeer, lampoonery, ludicrous representation, mimicry, mockery, pasquinade, raillery, ridiculum, sarcasm, satire,… …   Law dictionary


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